Justice Shacheendra Dwivedi Memorial Lecture on Human Rights in Indian Culture and Philosophy at NLIU Bhopal [Press Release]

Justice Mishra said equality of all human beings had been at the root of Indian philosophy and the contemporary thought of globalisation can also be traced to Indian thought hundreds of years ago.
 Justice Arun Mishra
Justice Arun Mishra

On 22 November, Justice Arun Mishra, Chairperson, National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) delivered the Justice Shacheendra Dwivedi Memorial Lecture on Human Rights in Indian Culture and Philosophy at NLIU Bhopal.

On the occasion, Justice Mishra also unveiled the logo of e-Nyayaganga.

‘e-Nyayaganga’ is a Project under the Scheme on Access to Justice sponsored by the Department of Justice titled, ‘Designing Innovative Solutions and Holistic Access to Justice (DISHA)’.

NLIU, Bhopal has been designated as the National Nodal Agency by the Department of Justice.

The designed logo is an Indian depiction of Lady Justice in Gond Tribal Art as it signifies that the justice is for all and must reach the last man standing or antyodaya.

Human rights in the present form were adopted 75 years ago, but they form the roots of Indian culture and philosophy. We are equal by birth and have the same rights. The principle of equality of people forms the basis of human rights, said Justice Mishra in his lecture.

Quoting the Rig Veda and Guru Nanak, he said equality of all human beings has been at the root of Indian philosophy and the contemporary thought of globalisation can also be traced to Indian thought hundreds of years ago as Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam (the whole world is a family) is the pivotal principle of Indian thought and philosophy.

Justice Mishra further said that the campaign to preserve the environment also has its roots in the past. Living in sync with nature has been a special feature of Indian culture. The sun and wind are gods in our culture and water is also worshipped. All the elements, who have made life possible on this earth, have been worshipped in our culture. Respect for nature ensures health, clean environment and prosperity for human beings.

In the blind race for progress, religion and ethics have been pushed to the margin. Today, we desperately need technology soaked in moral values. Technology is a power but we need knowledge and science rooted in moral values to save ourselves from destruction, which is not possible without religious conduct. Moral and ethical values can’t be insulated from knowledge, science and the good of the human beings.

The United Nations had adopted universal human rights on December 10, 1948 and this day was declared as Human Rights Day. Two Indian women had played an important role in drafting of human rights. Hansa Jeevraj Mehta replaced “all men are born free and equal” with “All human beings are born free and equal”, thereby making the draft gender sensitive and the amendment moved by her was adopted.

Laxmi Menon took the initiative in inclusion of “there should be gender-based discrimination” and “men and women have equal right” in the draft, said Justice Mishra.  

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